Orthodox Rabbinic Statement on Christianity

Austausch zu Fragen bzgl. Kirchen u. Konfessionsgemeinschaften

Orthodox Rabbinic Statement on Christianity

Beitragvon Michael » 19. Dezember 2015, 12:25

Hallo hier eine bemerkenswerte Stellungnahme:

Orthodox Rabbinic Statement on Christianity

December 3, 2015

To Do the Will of Our Father in Heaven:
Toward a Partnership between Jews and Christians

After nearly two millennia of mutual hostility and alienation, we Orthodox Rabbis who lead communities, institutions and seminaries in Israel, the United States and Europe recognize the historic opportunity now before us. We seek to do the will of our Father in Heaven by accepting the hand offered to us by our Christian brothers and sisters. Jews and Christians must work together as partners to address the moral challenges of our era.

The Shoah ended 70 years ago. It was the warped climax to centuries of disrespect, oppression and rejection of Jews and the consequent enmity that developed between Jews and Christians. In retrospect it is clear that the failure to break through this contempt and engage in constructive dialogue for the good of humankind weakened resistance to evil forces of anti-Semitism that engulfed the world in murder and genocide.
We recognize that since the Second Vatican Council the official teachings of the Catholic Church about Judaism have changed fundamentally and irrevocably. The promulgation of Nostra Aetate fifty years ago started the process of reconciliation between our two communities. Nostra Aetate and the later official Church documents it inspired unequivocally reject any form of anti-Semitism, affirm the eternal Covenant between G-d and the Jewish people, reject deicide and stress the unique relationship between Christians and Jews, who were called “our elder brothers” by Pope John Paul II and “our fathers in faith” by Pope Benedict XVI. On this basis, Catholics and other Christian officials started an honest dialogue with Jews that has grown during the last five decades. We appreciate the Church’s affirmation of Israel’s unique place in sacred history and the ultimate world redemption. Today Jews have experienced sincere love and respect from many Christians that have been expressed in many dialogue initiatives, meetings and conferences around the world.
As did Maimonides and Yehudah Halevi,[1] we acknowledge that Christianity is neither an accident nor an error, but the willed divine outcome and gift to the nations. In separating Judaism and Christianity, G-d willed a separation between partners with significant theological differences, not a separation between enemies. Rabbi Jacob Emden wrote that “Jesus brought a double goodness to the world. On the one hand he strengthened the Torah of Moses majestically… and not one of our Sages spoke out more emphatically concerning the immutability of the Torah. On the other hand he removed idols from the nations and obligated them in the seven commandments of Noah so that they would not behave like animals of the field, and instilled them firmly with moral traits…..Christians are congregations that work for the sake of heaven who are destined to endure, whose intent is for the sake of heaven and whose reward will not denied.”[2] Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch taught us that Christians “have accepted the Jewish Bible of the Old Testament as a book of Divine revelation. They profess their belief in the G-d of Heaven and Earth as proclaimed in the Bible and they acknowledge the sovereignty of Divine Providence.”[3] Now that the Catholic Church has acknowledged the eternal Covenant between G-d and Israel, we Jews can acknowledge the ongoing constructive validity of Christianity as our partner in world redemption, without any fear that this will be exploited for missionary purposes. As stated by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel’s Bilateral Commission with the Holy See under the leadership of Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen, “We are no longer enemies, but unequivocal partners in articulating the essential moral values for the survival and welfare of humanity”.[4] Neither of us can achieve G-d’s mission in this world alone.
Both Jews and Christians have a common covenantal mission to perfect the world under the sovereignty of the Almighty, so that all humanity will call on His name and abominations will be removed from the earth. We understand the hesitation of both sides to affirm this truth and we call on our communities to overcome these fears in order to establish a relationship of trust and respect. Rabbi Hirsch also taught that the Talmud puts Christians “with regard to the duties between man and man on exactly the same level as Jews. They have a claim to the benefit of all the duties not only of justice but also of active human brotherly love.” In the past relations between Christians and Jews were often seen through the adversarial relationship of Esau and Jacob, yet Rabbi Naftali Zvi Berliner (Netziv) already understood at the end of the 19th century that Jews and Christians are destined by G-d to be loving partners: “In the future when the children of Esau are moved by pure spirit to recognize the people of Israel and their virtues, then we will also be moved to recognize that Esau is our brother.”[5]
We Jews and Christians have more in common than what divides us: the ethical monotheism of Abraham; the relationship with the One Creator of Heaven and Earth, Who loves and cares for all of us; Jewish Sacred Scriptures; a belief in a binding tradition; and the values of life, family, compassionate righteousness, justice, inalienable freedom, universal love and ultimate world peace. Rabbi Moses Rivkis (Be’er Hagoleh) confirms this and wrote that “the Sages made reference only to the idolator of their day who did not believe in the creation of the world, the Exodus, G-d’s miraculous deeds and the divinely given law. In contrast, the people among whom we are scattered believe in all these essentials of religion.”[6]
Our partnership in no way minimizes the ongoing differences between the two communities and two religions. We believe that G-d employs many messengers to reveal His truth, while we affirm the fundamental ethical obligations that all people have before G-d that Judaism has always taught through the universal Noahide covenant.
In imitating G-d, Jews and Christians must offer models of service, unconditional love and holiness. We are all created in G-d’s Holy Image, and Jews and Christians will remain dedicated to the Covenant by playing an active role together in redeeming the world.
Initial signatories (in alphabetical order):

Rabbi Jehoshua Ahrens (Germany)
Rabbi Marc Angel (United States)
Rabbi Isak Asiel (Chief Rabbi of Serbia)
Rabbi David Bigman (Israel)
Rabbi David Bollag (Switzerland)
Rabbi David Brodman (Israel)
Rabbi Natan Lopez Cardozo (Israel)
Rav Yehudah Gilad (Israel)
Rabbi Alon Goshen-Gottstein (Israel)
Rabbi Irving Greenberg (United States)
Rabbi Marc Raphael Guedj (Switzerland)
Rabbi Eugene Korn (Israel)
Rabbi Daniel Landes (Israel)
Rabbi Steven Langnas (Germany)
Rabbi Benjamin Lau (Israel)
Rabbi Simon Livson (Chief Rabbi of Finland)
Rabbi Asher Lopatin (United States)
Rabbi Shlomo Riskin (Israel)
Rabbi David Rosen (Israel)
Rabbi Naftali Rothenberg (Israel)
Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger (Israel)
Rabbi Shmuel Sirat (France)
Rabbi Daniel Sperber (Israel)
Rabbi Jeremiah Wohlberg (United States)
Rabbi Alan Yuter (Israel)

Subsequent signatories:

Rabbi Herzl Hefter (Israel)
Rabbi David Jaffe (USA)
Rabbi David Kalb (USA)
Rabbi Shaya Kilimnick (USA)
Rabbi Yehoshua Looks (Israel)
Rabbi Ariel Mayse (USA)
Rabbi David Rose (UK)
Rabbi Zvi Solomons (UK)
Rabbi Yair Silverman (Israel)
Rabbi Daniel Raphael Silverstein (USA)
Rabbi Lawrence Zierler (USA)

Was denkt Ihr darüber?

Liebe Grüße Michael
Michael
 
Beiträge: 118
Registriert: 5. Juni 2012, 22:39

Re: Orthodox Rabbinic Statement on Christianity

Beitragvon Stefan » 8. Januar 2016, 23:13

Michael hat geschrieben:Hallo hier eine bemerkenswerte Stellungnahme:

Orthodox Rabbinic Statement on Christianity

December 3, 2015

To Do the Will of Our Father in Heaven:
Toward a Partnership between Jews and Christians

After nearly two millennia of mutual hostility and alienation, we Orthodox Rabbis who lead communities, institutions and seminaries in Israel, the United States and Europe recognize the historic opportunity now before us. We seek to do the will of our Father in Heaven by accepting the hand offered to us by our Christian brothers and sisters. Jews and Christians must work together as partners to address the moral challenges of our era.

The Shoah ended 70 years ago. It was the warped climax to centuries of disrespect, oppression and rejection of Jews and the consequent enmity that developed between Jews and Christians. In retrospect it is clear that the failure to break through this contempt and engage in constructive dialogue for the good of humankind weakened resistance to evil forces of anti-Semitism that engulfed the world in murder and genocide.
We recognize that since the Second Vatican Council the official teachings of the Catholic Church about Judaism have changed fundamentally and irrevocably. The promulgation of Nostra Aetate fifty years ago started the process of reconciliation between our two communities. Nostra Aetate and the later official Church documents it inspired unequivocally reject any form of anti-Semitism, affirm the eternal Covenant between G-d and the Jewish people, reject deicide and stress the unique relationship between Christians and Jews, who were called “our elder brothers” by Pope John Paul II and “our fathers in faith” by Pope Benedict XVI. On this basis, Catholics and other Christian officials started an honest dialogue with Jews that has grown during the last five decades. We appreciate the Church’s affirmation of Israel’s unique place in sacred history and the ultimate world redemption. Today Jews have experienced sincere love and respect from many Christians that have been expressed in many dialogue initiatives, meetings and conferences around the world.
As did Maimonides and Yehudah Halevi,[1] we acknowledge that Christianity is neither an accident nor an error, but the willed divine outcome and gift to the nations. In separating Judaism and Christianity, G-d willed a separation between partners with significant theological differences, not a separation between enemies. Rabbi Jacob Emden wrote that “Jesus brought a double goodness to the world. On the one hand he strengthened the Torah of Moses majestically… and not one of our Sages spoke out more emphatically concerning the immutability of the Torah. On the other hand he removed idols from the nations and obligated them in the seven commandments of Noah so that they would not behave like animals of the field, and instilled them firmly with moral traits…..Christians are congregations that work for the sake of heaven who are destined to endure, whose intent is for the sake of heaven and whose reward will not denied.”[2] Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch taught us that Christians “have accepted the Jewish Bible of the Old Testament as a book of Divine revelation. They profess their belief in the G-d of Heaven and Earth as proclaimed in the Bible and they acknowledge the sovereignty of Divine Providence.”[3] Now that the Catholic Church has acknowledged the eternal Covenant between G-d and Israel, we Jews can acknowledge the ongoing constructive validity of Christianity as our partner in world redemption, without any fear that this will be exploited for missionary purposes. As stated by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel’s Bilateral Commission with the Holy See under the leadership of Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen, “We are no longer enemies, but unequivocal partners in articulating the essential moral values for the survival and welfare of humanity”.[4] Neither of us can achieve G-d’s mission in this world alone.
Both Jews and Christians have a common covenantal mission to perfect the world under the sovereignty of the Almighty, so that all humanity will call on His name and abominations will be removed from the earth. We understand the hesitation of both sides to affirm this truth and we call on our communities to overcome these fears in order to establish a relationship of trust and respect. Rabbi Hirsch also taught that the Talmud puts Christians “with regard to the duties between man and man on exactly the same level as Jews. They have a claim to the benefit of all the duties not only of justice but also of active human brotherly love.” In the past relations between Christians and Jews were often seen through the adversarial relationship of Esau and Jacob, yet Rabbi Naftali Zvi Berliner (Netziv) already understood at the end of the 19th century that Jews and Christians are destined by G-d to be loving partners: “In the future when the children of Esau are moved by pure spirit to recognize the people of Israel and their virtues, then we will also be moved to recognize that Esau is our brother.”[5]
We Jews and Christians have more in common than what divides us: the ethical monotheism of Abraham; the relationship with the One Creator of Heaven and Earth, Who loves and cares for all of us; Jewish Sacred Scriptures; a belief in a binding tradition; and the values of life, family, compassionate righteousness, justice, inalienable freedom, universal love and ultimate world peace. Rabbi Moses Rivkis (Be’er Hagoleh) confirms this and wrote that “the Sages made reference only to the idolator of their day who did not believe in the creation of the world, the Exodus, G-d’s miraculous deeds and the divinely given law. In contrast, the people among whom we are scattered believe in all these essentials of religion.”[6]
Our partnership in no way minimizes the ongoing differences between the two communities and two religions. We believe that G-d employs many messengers to reveal His truth, while we affirm the fundamental ethical obligations that all people have before G-d that Judaism has always taught through the universal Noahide covenant.
In imitating G-d, Jews and Christians must offer models of service, unconditional love and holiness. We are all created in G-d’s Holy Image, and Jews and Christians will remain dedicated to the Covenant by playing an active role together in redeeming the world.
Initial signatories (in alphabetical order):

Rabbi Jehoshua Ahrens (Germany)
Rabbi Marc Angel (United States)
Rabbi Isak Asiel (Chief Rabbi of Serbia)
Rabbi David Bigman (Israel)
Rabbi David Bollag (Switzerland)
Rabbi David Brodman (Israel)
Rabbi Natan Lopez Cardozo (Israel)
Rav Yehudah Gilad (Israel)
Rabbi Alon Goshen-Gottstein (Israel)
Rabbi Irving Greenberg (United States)
Rabbi Marc Raphael Guedj (Switzerland)
Rabbi Eugene Korn (Israel)
Rabbi Daniel Landes (Israel)
Rabbi Steven Langnas (Germany)
Rabbi Benjamin Lau (Israel)
Rabbi Simon Livson (Chief Rabbi of Finland)
Rabbi Asher Lopatin (United States)
Rabbi Shlomo Riskin (Israel)
Rabbi David Rosen (Israel)
Rabbi Naftali Rothenberg (Israel)
Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger (Israel)
Rabbi Shmuel Sirat (France)
Rabbi Daniel Sperber (Israel)
Rabbi Jeremiah Wohlberg (United States)
Rabbi Alan Yuter (Israel)

Subsequent signatories:

Rabbi Herzl Hefter (Israel)
Rabbi David Jaffe (USA)
Rabbi David Kalb (USA)
Rabbi Shaya Kilimnick (USA)
Rabbi Yehoshua Looks (Israel)
Rabbi Ariel Mayse (USA)
Rabbi David Rose (UK)
Rabbi Zvi Solomons (UK)
Rabbi Yair Silverman (Israel)
Rabbi Daniel Raphael Silverstein (USA)
Rabbi Lawrence Zierler (USA)

Was denkt Ihr darüber?

Liebe Grüße Michael


Leider gibt es hier auch welche, die keine Fremdsprache beherrschen. Wäre es möglich, diesen Beitrag in Deutsch zu übersetzen? Vielen Dank im Voraus.
Stefan
 
Beiträge: 73
Registriert: 3. Dezember 2015, 17:18

Re: Orthodox Rabbinic Statement on Christianity

Beitragvon uli » 22. Januar 2016, 19:06

Man kann den Artikel auch auf Deutsch lesen,
hier:
http://www.jcrelations.net/Den_Willen_u ... 0.html?L=2

oder hier:

Den Willen unseres Vaters im Himmel tun:
Hin zu einer Partnerschaft zwischen Juden und Christen*

| 01.01.2016
Nach fast zwei Jahrtausenden der Feindseligkeit und Entfremdung erkennen wir, orthodoxe Rabbiner, Leiter von Gemeinden, Institutionen und Seminaren in Israel, den Vereinigten Staaten und Europa, die sich uns darbietende historische Gelegenheit: Wir möchten den Willen unseres Vaters im Himmel tun, indem wir die uns angebotene Hand unserer christlichen Brüder und Schwestern ergreifen. Juden und Christen müssen als Partner zusammenarbeiten, um den moralischen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit zu begegnen.

Die Schoah endete vor 70 Jahren. Mit ihr hatten Jahrhunderte der Verachtung, Unterdrückung und Zurückweisung von Juden und die daraus folgende Feindseligkeit zwischen Juden und Christen den absurden Höhepunkt erreicht. Zurückblickend wird deutlich, dass der Misserfolg, diese Verachtung zu überwinden und stattdessen einen konstruktiven Dialog zum Wohle der Menschheit aufzunehmen, den Widerstand gegenüber den bösen Kräften des Antisemitismus geschwächt hat, die die Welt in Mord und Genozid gestürzt haben.

Wir würdigen, dass sich die offiziellen Lehren der katholischen Kirche über das Judentum seit dem Zweiten Vatikanischen Konzil grundlegend und unwiderruflich geändert haben. Mit der Promulgation von Nostra Aetate begann vor 50 Jahren der Aussöhnungsprozess zwischen der katholischen Kirche und dem Judentum. Nostra Aetate und die darauf folgenden offiziellen Dokumente der Kirche lehnen unmissverständlich jede Form von Antisemitismus ab, bestätigen den ewigen Bund zwischen G-tt und dem jüdischen Volk, weisen die Lehre des G-ttesmordes zurück und betonen die einzigartige Beziehung zwischen Christen und Juden, welche von Papst Johannes Paul II. „unsere älteren Brüder“ und von Papst Benedikt XVI. „unsere Väter im Glauben“ genannt wurden. Darauf basierend begannen Katholiken und andere christliche Amtsträger einen aufrichtigen Dialog mit dem Judentum, der sich während der letzten fünf Jahrzehnte stetig verstärkt hat. Wir schätzen die Bestätigung der einzigartigen Stellung Israels in der Heilsgeschichte und bei der letztendlichen Erlösung der Welt seitens der Kirche. Juden haben heute im Rahmen zahlreicher Dialog-Initiativen, Treffen und Konferenzen weltweit ernst gemeinte Liebe und Respekt von zahlreichen Christinnen und Christen erfahren.

Wie Maimonides und Jehudah Halevi vor uns [1] erkennen wir an, dass das Christentum weder ein Zufall noch ein Irrtum ist, sondern gö-ttlich gewollt und ein Geschenk an die Völker. Indem Er Judentum und Christenheit getrennt hat, wollte G-t eine Trennung zwischen Partnern mit erheblichen theologischen Differenzen, nicht jedoch eine Trennung zwischen Feinden. Rabbiner Jacob Emden schrieb, dass „Jesus der Welt eine doppelte Güte zuteil werden liess. Einerseits stärkte er die Torah von Moses in majestätische Art … und keiner unserer Weisen sprach jemals nachdrücklicher über die Unveränderlichkeit der Torah. Andererseits beseitigte er die Götzen der Völker und verpflichtete die Völker auf die sieben Noachidischen Gebote, so dass sie sich nicht wie wilde Tiere des Feldes aufführten, und brachte ihnen grundlegende moralische Eigenschaften bei … Christen sind Gemeinden, die zum himmlischen Wohl wirken und zu Dauerhaftigkeit bestimmt sind. Ihre Bestimmung ist zum himmlischen Wohl und die Belohnung wird ihnen nicht versagt bleiben.“[2] Rabbiner Samson Raphael Hirsch lehrt uns, Christen haben „die jüdische Bibel des Alten Testamentes als Buch gö-ttlicher Offenbarung akzeptiert. Sie bekennen ihren Glauben an den G-t von Himmel und Erde, wie ihn die Bibel verkündet, und sie anerkennen die Herrschaft der gö-ttlichen Vorsehung.“[3] Jetzt, da die katholische Kirche den ewigen Bund zwischen G-t und Israel anerkannt hat, können wir Juden die fortwährende konstruktive Gültigkeit des Christentums als unser Partner bei der Welterlösung anerkennen, ohne jede Angst, dass dies zu missionarischen Zwecken missbraucht werden könnte. Wie von der Bilateralen Kommission des israelischen Oberrabbinats mit dem Heiligen Stuhl unter Vorsitz von Rabbiner Shear Yashuv Cohen festgestellt, sind „wir nicht länger Feinde, sondern unwiderrufliche Partner bei der Artikulierung der wesentlichen moralischen Werte für das Überleben und das Wohl der Menschheit.“[4] Keiner von uns kann G-ttes Auftrag in dieser Welt alleine erfüllen.

Juden wie Christen haben eine gemeinsame Aufgabe in der Verheißung des Bundes, die Welt unter der Herrschaft des Allmächtigen zu verbessern, so dass die gesamte Menschheit Seinen Namen anruft und Laster von der Erde verbannt werden. Wir verstehen das Zögern beider Seiten, diese Wahrheit anzuerkennen, und fordern unsere Gemeinschaften zur Überwindung dieser Ängste auf, um ein auf Vertrauen und Respekt gegründetes Verhältnis zu schaffen. Rabbiner Hirsch lehrte ebenfalls, der Talmud stelle Christen „in Bezug auf die Pflichten von Mensch zu Mensch auf eine Stufe mit den Juden. Sie haben Anspruch auf sämtliche Vorteile der Verpflichtungen, nicht nur in Bezug auf Gerechtigkeit, sondern auch auf aktive, brüderliche Liebe.“ In der Vergangenheit wurden Beziehungen zwischen Christen und Juden häufig im Spiegel der Feindseligkeit zwischen Esau und Jakob betrachtet. Aber Rabbiner Naftali Zvi Berliner (Netziv) erkannte bereits Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts, dass G-tt Juden und Christen zu liebevoller Partnerschaft bestimmt hat: „Wenn die Kinder von Esau zukünftig vom reinen Geist zur Anerkennung des Volkes Israel und dessen Tugenden veranlasst werden, werden auch wir Esau als unseren Bruder anerkennen.“[5]

Wir Juden und Christen haben viel mehr gemeinsam, als was uns trennt: den ethischen Monotheismus Abrahams; die Beziehung zum Einen Schöpfer des Himmels und der Erde, der uns alle liebt und umsorgt; die jüdische Heilige Schrift; den Glauben an eine verbindliche Tradition; die Werte des Lebens, der Familie, mitfühlender Rechtschaffenheit, der Gerechtigkeit, unveräußerlicher Freiheit, universeller Liebe und des letztendlichen Weltfriedens. Rabbi Moses Rivkis (Be’er Hagoleh) bestätigt dies und schrieb, dass „die Weisen nur auf die Götzendiener ihrer Zeit Bezug nahmen, die nicht an die Schöpfung der Welt glaubten, den Exodus, an Gottes Wundertaten und an das von Gott gegebene Gesetz. Im Gegensatz dazu glauben die Menschen, unter die wir verstreut sind, an all diese wesentlichen Bestandteile der Religion.“[6]

Unsere Partnerschaft bagatellisiert in keiner Weise die weiterhin bestehenden Differenzen zwischen beiden Gemeinschaften und Religionen. Wir glauben, dass G-tt viele Boten nutzt, um Seine Wahrheit zu offenbaren, während wir die fundamentalen ethischen Verpflichtungen aller Menschen vor G-tt bestätigen, die das Judentum stets durch den universellen Bund Noahs gelehrt hat.

Indem sie G-tt nachfolgen, müssen Juden und Christen Vorbilder geben in Dienst, bedingungsloser Liebe und Heiligkeit. Wir sind alle im heiligen Ebenbild G-ttes geschaffen und Juden wie Christen werden diesem Bund treu bleiben, indem sie gemeinsam eine aktive Rolle bei der Erlösung der Welt übernehmen.
3. Dezember 2015

Bisherige Unterzeichner (in alphabetischer Reihenfolge)

Rabbiner Jehoshua Ahrens (Deutschland)
Rabbiner Marc Angel (USA)
Rabbiner Isak Asiel (Oberrabbiner von Serbien)
Rabbiner David Bauman (USA)
Rabbiner Abraham Benhamu (Peru)
Rabbiner Todd Berman (Israel)
Rabbiner Michael Beyo (USA)
Rabbiner David Bigman (Israel)
Rabbiner David Bollag (Schweiz)
Rabbiner David Brodman (Israel)
Rabbiner Natan Lopez Cardozo (Israel)
Rabbiner Michael Chernick (USA)
Rabbiner Kotel Dadon (Oberrabbiner von Kroatien)
Rabbiner David Ellis (Kanada)
Rabbiner Seth Farber (Israel)
Rabbiner Yehudah Gilad (Israel)
Rabbiner Alon Goshen-Gottstein (Israel)
Rabbiner Ben Greenberg (USA)
Rabbiner Irving Greenberg (USA)
Rabbiner Marc Raphael Guedj (Schweiz)
Rabbiner David ben Meir Hasson (Chile)
Rabbiner Herzl Hefter (Israel)
Rabbiner Zvi Herberger (Norwegen/Estland)
Rabbiner Yeshayahu Hollander (Israel)
Rabbiner David Jaffe (USA)
Rabbiner David Kalb (USA)
Rabbiner Shaya Kilimnick (USA)
Rabbiner Eugene Korn (Israel)
Rabbiner Daniel Landes (Israel)
Rabbiner Steven Langnas (Deutschland)
Rabbiner Benjamin Lau (Israel)
Rabbiner Simon Livson (Oberrabbiner von Finnland)
Rabbiner Yehoshua Looks (Israel)
Rabbiner Asher Lopatin (USA)
Rabbiner Ariel Mayse (USA)
Rabbiner Bryan Opert (Südafrika)
Rabbiner Shlomo Riskin (Israel)
Rabbiner David Rose (GB)
Rabbiner David Rosen (Israel)
Rabbiner Naftali Rothenberg (Israel)
Rabbiner Hanan Schlesinger (Israel)
Rabbiner Yair Silverman (Israel)
Rabbiner Daniel Raphael Silverstein (USA)
Rabbiner Shmuel Sirat (Frankreich)
Rabbiner Zvi Solomons (GB)
Rabbiner Daniel Sperber (Israel)
Rabbiner Mashada Vaivsaunu (Armenien)
Rabbiner Jeremiah Wohlberg (USA)
Rabbiner Shmuel Yanklowitz (USA)
Rabbiner Alan Yuter (Israel)
Rabbiner Lawrence Zierler (USA)
uli
 
Beiträge: 2
Registriert: 28. Dezember 2015, 19:56


Zurück zu Konfessionsgemeinschaften

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 1 Gast

cron